Study: Optimism Can Change Brain Volume, Providing Protection Against Emotional Distress

Study: Optimism Can Change Brain Volume, Providing Protection Against Emotional Distress

In an effort to research how certain personality traits protect against emotional distress, such as depression and anxiety, researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois examined 85 healthy college students. The study, “Neuro-Behavioral Mechanisms of Resilience against Emotional Distress: An Integrative Brain-Personality-Symptom Approach using Structural Equation Modeling,” was published in the August edition of Personality Neuroscience.

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Robot reef protector sees a new way to check Great Barrier Reef health

Robot reef protector sees a new way to check Great Barrier Reef health

An underwater drone that can keep watch on reef health and accurately identify and inject the devastating crown-of-thorns starfish is ready to be put to the test on the Great Barrier Reef, as a result of a collaboration between QUT, Google and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation.

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Using deep-learning techniques to locate potential human activities in videos

Using deep-learning techniques to locate potential human activities in videos

When a police officer begins to raise a hand in traffic, human drivers realize that the officer is about to signal them to stop. But computers find it harder to work out people's next likely actions based on their current behavior. Now, a team of A*STAR researchers and colleagues has developed a detector that can successfully pick out where human actions will occur in videos, in almost real-time.

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CRISPR halts Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression in dogs

CRISPR halts Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression in dogs

Scientists for the first time have used CRISPR gene editing to halt the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a large mammal, according to a study by UT Southwestern that provides a strong indication that a lifesaving treatment may be in the pipeline. The research published in Science documents unprecedented improvement in the muscle fibers of dogs with DMD – the most common fatal genetic disease in children, caused by a mutation that inhibits the production of dystrophin, a protein critical for muscle function.

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Sex on the Brain: Frequent Sex Might Have Cognitive Benefits

Sex on the Brain: Frequent Sex Might Have Cognitive Benefits

Frequent sex might enhance our performance on certain cognitive tasks. A growing body of research on both humans and animals published in the last decade points to this conclusion, including a new study in the Archives of Sexual Behavior. Here's a look at the accumulated evidence and what it suggests about how sex might benefit the brain.

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How your brain experiences time

How your brain experiences time

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in Norway in have discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories. "This network provides timestamps for events and keeps track of the order of events within an experience," says Professor Edvard Moser, Nobel laureate and director of the Kavli Institute, which is based at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). This area of the brain where time is experienced is located right next to the area that codes for space.

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Many young adults lack financial literacy, economic stability, study finds

Many young adults lack financial literacy, economic stability, study finds

Nearly a third of young adults in a recent study were found to be “financially precarious” because they had poor financial literacy and lacked money management skills and income stability. Only 22 percent of the 18- to 24-year-olds in the study sample were deemed to be financially stable, according to lead author Gaurav Sinha, a graduate student in social work at the University of Illinois.

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